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Paycom Stands Out with Latest Accomplishment

Paycom continues to rake in the accolades, this time garnering its 11th-consecutive appearance on the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber’s Metro 50 list. Of the Metro 50 winners, Paycom’s 11-year reign of consecutive appearances is the most of any of the companies on the list.

“This is huge honor to be the longest-running member on this distinguished list,” Paycom founder and CEO Chad Richison said. “But even more, this award is an indicator that our unique business model has resulted in continued, steady and sustainable growth.”

The Metro 50 event is scheduled for Sept. 23 at the National Cowboy and Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City where rankings of all of the Metro 50 winners will be announced.

The accolade showcases the metropolitan’s fastest-growing private companies. Qualified companies are required to have revenues of at least $1 million for the previous year and will be ranked based on their percentage of annual growth.

Growth is the name of the game at Paycom. In the last 12 months, the online human capital management provider announced rapid growth with an addition to its headquarters and added the Inc. Hire Power Award which recognizes private companies that are leading the way in job creation. Stay tuned for more exciting news from one of the fastest-growing companies in America.



Author Bio: A writer, speaker and young business leader, Jason has been the communications pulse for a number of organizations, including Paycom. A featured writer on human capital management technology, leadership and the Affordable Care Act, Jason launched Paycom’s blog and social media channels, helping empower organizations around the nation. Jason is attuned to the needs of businesses and recently helped develop a tool to aid organizations in their pursuit to comply with the ACA; one of the largest changes in healthcare the country has seen. While working in athletics for ESPN and FoxSports, Jason learned the importance of hard work and branding. In his free time he enjoys adventuring with his family, reading and exploring new areas to strengthen his business acumen.

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Department of Labor Announces Details of Final Overtime Rule

Yesterday, the U.S. Department of Labor announced the final details of its overtime rule in a fact sheet issued prior to publication in the Federal Register.

Key provisions of the final rule:

  1. Set the standard salary level at $913 per week or $47,476 annually;
  2. Set total annual compensation requirements for highly compensated employees to $134,004; and
  3. Establish a mechanism for automatically updating threshold levels every three years to ensure it remains relevant.

The Good News

If there’s a silver lining in the final rule for employers, it’s that the effective date is set for Dec. 1, which gives businesses a little more time to comply than the original predictions of 60 to 120 days.

Employers also will be allowed to use non-discretionary bonuses and incentive payments (including commissions) to satisfy up to 10 percent of the new salary threshold.

As a result of the changes in salary level, the number of workers employers must apply the duties test to is reduced, simplifying the exemption.

Taking Action

Knowing the number of salaried employees making less than the new threshold, as well as the number of overtime hours they work, may help you determine the best options for mitigating the impact overtime changes could have on your business.

One option is to convert salaried workers making less than the new threshold amount to hourly. This option would require the tracking of hours worked and overtime paid, according to the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Another consideration is to raise some employees’ annual salaries above the new threshold of $913 a week ($47,476 per year) in order to preserve their exempt status. This solution might apply best to situations in which overtime hours cannot be avoided, because paying these employees time-and-a-half actually would be more expensive in the long run than simply raising their salaries above the new threshold.

Other options include shifting more work to other salaried employees or hiring additional people to offset the workload performed by previously exempt employees who now will have to be paid time-and-a-half for overtime hours.

There are many scenarios to consider and with the Dec. 1 deadline looming, it’s important for employers to not only prepare for the new overtime protections, but have a scalable plan in place to address the automatic threshold updates scheduled for every three years.

Is Your HR Tech up to the Task?

Your HR technology should play a pivotal role in managing any workforce challenge. From scheduling, time tracking and overtime reports to hiring, training and compliance, the right HR software will offer a full-service, single-database solution to handle it all.

For more information regarding the overtime rule, stay tuned to our blog. We will be updating as new changes surface. Additional resources on overtime expansion can be found at Paycom.com/overtime.    


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by Brie Hobbs


Author Bio: For more than eight years, Brie has been writing to both job seekers and business leaders about human resources and the challenges facing today’s workforce. Her articles have appeared on award-winning career and HR blogs, as well as on the International Franchise Association’s SmartBrief and other notable publications. With a background in franchising, Brie focuses on helping franchise organizations understand how Paycom’s human capital management technology can benefit their business.

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How to Solve the Biggest Problems Surrounding Performance Reviews

In a study of company processes influencing employee motivation, performance reviews received a total motivation score of 41 points, based on a scale from -100 to 100. Yet, for varied reasons, appraisals often fail to produce results – conducting reviews late, not setting clear objectives, using an inefficient HR and payroll solution, and inadequate management training being among the most common. Here’s how to address the common problems with performance reviews.

Late Reviews

Even the most well-intentioned manager can become so busy that he or she fails to complete performance reviews on time. But, late reviews may cause employees to feel as though their contributions aren’t valued, which can demotivate them and hinder their performance. When managers have the resources to complete evaluations on time – such as an HR and payroll solution that reduces review preparation time – it’s easier for them to follow through and conduct timely reviews.

Unclear Goals

Employees need clear, specific, comprehensible, attainable and measureable goals that are challenging and relevant to the organization’s objectives. Telling an employee to “increase production” doesn’t precisely convey your expectations. A better strategy would be to say that she needs to increase production by five units per hour by Jan. 1. This clearly articulates what’s expected of her and gives you a quantifiable basis for rating her performance.

Personal Biases

It’s not uncommon for employees to complain about the unfairness of performance reviews. For instance, an employee might assume low performance ratings are a result of a personal issue the manager has with him or her. While this is a subjective viewpoint, personal biases do exist and must be avoided during the review process.

To reduce the risk of unfair appraisals, employers can use an HR and payroll solution that allows objective, verifiable measurements, such as:

  • quality, i.e. accuracy and usefulness of the work performed
  • quantity, i.e. level of productivity
  • timeliness, i.e. whether the work is completed by a certain date
  • cost-effectiveness, i.e. how efficiently the work was produced

During performance reviews, employees may ask questions that numbers alone cannot answer. They might, for example, seek their manager’s opinion on whether they have a bright future with the company. Even then, managers should strive for objectivity by providing concrete examples to support their assessments.

Mishandling of Poor Performers

Discussing employees’ deficiencies during performance reviews is a sensitive matter that managers must handle with tact and honesty. Withholding the truth about an employee’s subpar performance only stifles growth, while revealing the truth in a harsh manner fractures self-esteem. Try to strike a balance between being helpful yet firm. For example, give the employee a thorough action plan, schedule regular follow-up meetings and explain the consequences of repeated poor performance. Additionally, inadequacies should not first be discussed in the performance review. Instead managers should address issues as soon as they arrive in one-on-one sessions.

Not all employees respond favorably to bad news. A poor performer might cry, shout, walk away or seethe silently during the review. With appropriate training, managers can learn to gauge employee reactions and respond accordingly.

Lack of Employee-Job Alignment

Employees need responsibilities that match their capabilities. Otherwise, they will not achieve their potential or perform at the required level. To assist in employee job alignment, during performance reviews you might ask employees how they feel about their roles and capabilities. Based on their responses, you can discover their untapped potential or determine whether further training or job reassignment is needed.

Failure to Keep up with Technology

By embracing newer technology that enables accuracy and efficiency, employers can implement best-practice solutions for performance reviews. For example, a single-application HR and payroll solution lets you:

  • perform timely reviews by reminding you of upcoming appraisals.
  • set clear goals based on family, department, position or employee.
  • conduct objective reviews according to required competencies.
  • establish development goals to improve poor performance.
  • create and delegate positions that coincide with employees’ abilities.

Conducting performance reviews on time shows your commitment to your employees’ success. Keeping reviews focused on what can be proven reduces arbitrary ratings. When dealing with poor performer, merging empathy with truth reveals your desire to see them grow. Discovering employees’ abilities helps you delegate responsibilities to those most capable.

These strategies can boost employee motivation, but managers cannot accomplish them alone. They need proper support – such as an HR and payroll solution that simplifies yet strengthens the appraisal process.



Author Bio: As a Human Resource Professional with over 20 years of experience, Jenny has extensive experience in management, mentoring, policy development and recruiting. Jenny's team player mentality and leadership abilities make her an elite HR Director who is always on top of the latest HR trends. She relentlessly directs associates and executives to achieve their maximum potential for both themselves and their companies.

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Exploring Overtime Expansion: Nonprofits

This blog is the first in an ongoing series that answers questions most frequently asked during Paycom’s free webinar covering overtime expansion.

Soon, changes to the overtime rule are expected to expand protections to millions of workers nationwide. But how will overtime expansion affect nonprofits?

Since the details of the final rule haven’t been released, we’re operating on the assumption that they will be similar to those in the proposed rule. In that proposed rule, there’s no mention of changing how the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) applies to nonprofits, outside of the salary threshold. In other words, for the most part, the current provisions of the law are expected to continue to apply under the new rule.

What the FLSA says about nonprofits

Currently, the provisions of the FLSA cover some nonprofit employees, but not others. Employees of nonprofits are covered by the FLSA, and are likely to be affected by the new rule if:

  • The organization makes an “annual gross volume of sales made or business done of at least $500,000.” Note that income from contributions and donations, when used to further charitable activities, do not count toward that number.
  • The employee is “individually engaged in interstate commerce or the production of goods for interstate commerce,” which include tasks like making/receiving interstate telephone calls, shipping materials to another state and transporting persons or property across state lines.

Why your employees’ duties matter

If your organization has “an annual gross volume of sales made or business done of at least $500,000,” the law considers your nonprofit a “covered enterprise.” But that doesn’t necessarily mean that all of your employees are covered under the FLSA. Enterprise coverage applies only to duties employees perform for “a business purpose.”

For example, a nonprofit animal protection organization, with an annual gross volume of sales made or business done of at least $500,000, rescues abandoned pets and provides them shelter and veterinary care for free. The same organization sells pet products through an online store. The FLSA and the proposed rule would cover duties that supported the online store, not those duties related to the rescue and care of abandoned pets.

What about volunteers?

Typically, volunteers are not covered by the FLSA, and as a result, would not be subject to the proposed rule. But of course, the FLSA has specific guidance on the type of work bona fide volunteers can – and cannot – perform.

Generally, if a worker has “volunteered” to work in a commercial activity, or perform work that would otherwise be performed by regular employees, the law does not consider him or her as a volunteer, so the proposed rule would apply. If a paid employee volunteers to provide the same type of services to their nonprofit they’re employed to provide, that work must be included in the employees’ hours worked calculations.

What proposed overtime expansion looks like for nonprofits

If your organization is considered a covered enterprise, any employee who engages in “commercial activities for a business purpose” and makes less than $970 per week ($50,440 per year), would be eligible to receive overtime under the proposed rule.

Overtime expansion could represent substantial costs for your nonprofit. You might consider evaluating your workforce now to identify which employees are close to the proposed threshold and how many overtime hours those employees currently work.

A robust human capital technology management system makes it easy to gather such information, implement changes and protect your budget from increased labor costs and regulatory changes. This leaves you the time, energy and resources you need to achieve your organization’s true mission, regardless of the labor law climate.

For additional information on proposed overtime expansion and how it may impact your organization, stay tuned to the Paycom Blog. For additional resources, check out the Paycom Overtime Expansion Calculator or attend our free webinar.

The content of this blog is intended to keep interested parties informed of legal and industry developments for educational purposes only.  It is not intended as legal opinion or tax advice and should not be regarded as a substitute for legal or tax advice.

Sources:

U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division: Proposed Rule and Request for Comments: Defining and Delimiting the Exemptions for Executive, Administrative, Professional, Outside Sales and Computer Employees

U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division: Fact Sheet #14A: Non-Profit Organizations and the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division, Opinion Letters – FLSA: FLSA2005-33


amy.double

by Amy Double


Author Bio: Amy, a tenured professional in sales and marketing with over 10 years of experience, is dedicated to creating content focused on helping organizations achieve their business goals. As an experienced writer, Amy is committed to researching and blogging about topics that affect businesses across multiple industries, including manufacturing, hospitality and more. Outside of work, Amy enjoys reading, entertaining and spending time with family.

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